Remedy Your Thinking Errors

Common Thinking Errors and Their Remedies


Remedy Your Thinking Errors
Don’t believe everything you think:

Below are four of the most frequent thinking errors that arise automatically during acute anxiety, panic, and disturbing worry, each with perspectives and remedies for modifying them and relieving your anxiety.  Why not study these errors and – as soon as you recognize they’re occurring – try out the remedies? You may find you have the power and skill to choose sensible thoughts over irrational, negative thoughts and gain the upper hand over anxiety.


Thoughts are not facts.

 

Common Thinking Errors and Their Remedies

 

  1. Dwelling on false solutions to important problems “If I were better looking, I’d attract someone, and I wouldn’t be alone.” The more we dwell, the more real a notion seems, regardless of whether it’s rational. In this example, the reality of the matter is far more bittersweet and nuanced: Neither beauty, handsomeness, nor cosmetic surgery can curtail aloneness.

  2. All or Nothing Thinking – “It’s all my fault” is a classic all-or-nothing statement that illustrates looking at things in absolute, black-and-white categories. Your performance was totally good or totally bad; if you are not perfect, then you are a failure. This thinking error does not recognize shades of gray, only black or white.  We always share only a portion of both the blame and the credit with others.

    Remedy this error by honestly evaluating the negativity of your actions on a range from 0 to 100; recalling any neutral and positive actions, and then correcting your perspective (from David D. Burns (1989), The Feeling Good Handbook. New York: Penguin, 1989.)

  3. Catastrophizing – Catastrophizing is the essence of disturbing anxiety – potent, irrational thinking that arises “automatically” when our vital concerns or values seem jeopardized. Catastrophic thinking can make us feel like major upheavals or personal disasters are in the works and activate our instinctive “fight, flight, or freeze” reaction – despite the absence of solid evidence that a catastrophe actually will  Ask yourself earnestly, “Where’s the evidence?”
  4. Wild Ride in the Time MachineMuch anxious disturbance involves irrational fear of future plans and events. When we travel through time in our thoughts, it’s very easy to have wrong emotional reactions when you aren’t in the Here and Now. Deliberately return yourself to the present. Breathe in, pay attention, breathe out, pay attention – gather yourself and experience this moment mindfully. For now, just acknowledge and accept what really is.  This isn’t a time to judge yourself.